Mojave Desert, Joshua Tree
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Mojave Desert, Mojave Desert Land Trust


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Unauthorized Road – BEFORE Vertical Mulching
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Unauthorized Road – AFTER Vertical Mulching
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Land to be restored

The Stewardship program is a critical program to Mojave Desert Land Trust’s success. Here are some other ways you can help:

  • Attend a Land Steward Training and any of our monitoring/restoration events

  • Donate a shovel, rake, work gloves or your time to help us monitor and restore land

  • Donate money, gas cards, gallons of water for volunteers, and other nourishment
To support the Land Stewardship program, click here or for more information send an email to info@mojavedesertlandtrust.org.

 

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Land Stewardship Program

Our Land Stewardship Program is a great way to get out into the fresh air and untouched wilderness, have some fun hiking around, taking photos, recording observations and being part of our team for conservation!

Maintaining and restoring property are important to the mission of Mojave Desert Land Trust, and our Volunteer Land Stewards are instrumental in our ability to permanently protect the lands we acquire.  Land Stewards can join monthly group monitoring and restoration events led by the Mojave Desert Land Trust.  These monthly events can either be one-day outings or overnight campouts where volunteers can experience the untouched wilderness of our desert national parks, while learning about desert conservation and land stewardship techniques.  In 2011 MDLT’s Volunteer Land Stewards helped us to restore 1,319 acres and monitor 999 acres!

Land Monitoring

The land purchased by Mojave Desert Land Trust must be permanently monitored to ensure it remains undisturbed, even after it is donated to the National Park Service or other agency for management.  Each year, MDLT conducts training sessions for Volunteer Land Stewards (Ranger Training) where they learn valuable skills for land monitoring such as:

  • Locating properties in the field using GPS units and topographic maps
  • Monitoring properties and maintaining a written and photographic log
  • Documenting threats such as illegal use of off-highway vehicles and dumping
  • Documenting wildlife sightings for habitat modeling

Rangers need to be able to hike an average of 3 miles off trail on moderate desert terrain; have a vehicle to travel to Joshua Tree National Park and Mojave National Preserve; and be comfortable navigating to remote desert properties with a GPS unit, road map, and topographic map. 

Land Restoration

Mojave Desert Land Trust is committed to acquiring land, and also to restoring land that has been subject to dumping, contains toxic or other debris, or has unauthorized roads that cut through fragile habitat.  Land Stewards can join monthly group restoration events led by MDLT.  These monthly events can either be one-day outings or overnight campouts where volunteers can experience the untouched wilderness of our desert national parks, while learning about desert conservation and land restoration techniques.  These techniques include applying vertical mulch to promote re-vegetation and discourage access to unauthorized roads; defining hiking trails to minimize impact on surrounding lands; and building water bars to help restore the natural flow of water that sustains plants and animals.

View the 2012-13 Mid-season Land Stewardship Report

View Upcoming Land Stewardship Events



Painting ©
Diane Best
Landscape painting of the great Mojave Desert by Diane Best.

© 2016 Mojave Desert Land Trust. P.O. Box 1544 • 60124 29 Palms Hwy., Joshua Tree, CA 92252 • (760) 366-5440 • Fax (888) 869-4981 •
info@mojavedesertlandtrust.org
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